Google I/O Boulder

google i:o

Google held it’s annual developers conference, Google I/O, this week in San Francisco. There was a lot of great information and features announced and uncovered over the course of the two days of sessions. I was not lucky enough to get the opportunity to attend the conference so no I am not typing this while wearing Google Cardboard to alter my reality. I did however get to attend the Google I/O Extended at the local Boulder, CO offices. Many thanks to those individuals for the invite and putting on a great event.

The overall takeaway that I had from the event is that the future as Google sees it is your information displayed on the most convenient device for the moment. Whether that is the way we all use our phones every day, quick notifications on a wearable device like a watch, a more holistic TV experience or in our cars while we are in transit, having access to our data is supremely important to the Android platform going forward.

I am really excited to start playing with the SDK for Android Wear. If you’re not familiar with the MobileDay application, our primary goal is to get you in your meetings as quickly as possible. Our idea is that we’ll be able to alert you to an upcoming meeting. You’ll easily launch your call or online meeting without taking your phone out of your pocket. This is the next step in making conference calls easier, and I know that our customers are going to love it.

As far as the impact on development goes, it’s going to be minimal. We already use notifications to keep you abreast of upcoming appointments, now it’s just a matter of making sure those standard notifications will still look good on your watch. There will be the potential challenges of having to design for both a square and a circle form factor, but in the end it should be very easy for us to present our users their events in time for them to join their calls. From there we can grow our integration into giving the users the ability to scroll forward to future events as well as to take advantage of our Quick Call functionality – host immediate conferences between multiple people, organized by text and in only a few quick clicks. Plus, for those of us who will be late to our own funerals, the ability to tap one button on our watch to let everyone know we’ll be a few minutes late to our daily standup will be a great timesaver.

Believe me when I tell you that MobileDay is not going to stop at Android Wear. Android Auto and possibly even Android TV will hold new features and functionality for us to grow our app in the future. But in the short term I can’t wait to get a watch to play with.

Download MobileDay from the Google Play Store.

 

One-Touch Dialing – make life a little bit simpler

The guardian

One-touch dialing is all about productivity and making life a bit easier.

Previous to joining MobileDay, I recall a time when I was at my house getting ready for work and suddenly realized that I was already 1 minute late to a conference call. Panicking, I had to open my email and furiously search for the conference number. It was some obscure number coupled with a pin number AND a password. And I couldn’t find a pen to write it down. I finally found some lipstick and wrote the information on the mirror, and by the time I finally got into the call, I was about 5 minutes late and half crazed. Not the most productive conference call I’ve ever been part of.

MobileDay enables people to calmly dial into conference calls in the shortest time possible, without the use of lipstick as a writing instrument.

I found an article titled “How mobile enterprise apps allow micro-moments of productivity at work,” and it immediately brought to mind the effortless simplicity of MobileDay.

As the article says, what may at first seem like an insignificant micro improvement in productivity may in the long run add up and make a big difference. Not to mention that sometimes the improvement takes you from frantically scrambling for something, ANYTHING, to write with, to being reminded of your call and effortlessly and joining by pressing one big green button. Micro improvements may often times be overlooked because they seem so straightforward or obvious. In reality, if an application provides a micro improvement, it is likely an incredibly elegant application that has been very carefully developed to seem effortless.

A study cited in the article from Salesforce.com relates the three most important considerations when developers are building apps for “micro-moments.” They include: the user experience, design, and concept. The idea behind “concept” is that it’s called “micro” moment for a reason. A simple app should not overwhelm the user with all of its features, but should solve one problem, and do it well.  The concept of the app should be clean and uncluttered so that the user can understand in a heartbeat what the app is intended to help them with.

I find apps to be helpful not because they drastically revolutionize my life. I have a singular need, and my favorite apps solve the precise need in the shortest time possible, without trying to push other functionality that I’m not seeking. I happen to know that lots of people have the same pain that I experienced in the lipstick incident.

Gotta love apps that make life a little bit simpler!